A Gift Guide for Solar Lights | Gama Sonic

The holiday season is finally here, and with it comes the joy of discovering the perfect gifts for your closest friends. Each friend group is unique, but there are certain personality types that are common for everyone.

These quirky characters are sometimes hard to shop for. Luckily, there is a solar light that matches each unique personality. Let us help you finish your holiday shopping so you can enjoy the season with your friends. We have created a shopping list that will reflect your love and appreciation. Get started below.

Everyone knows at least one person in their circle of friends who has a "green thumb." These planters are often seen year-round tending to their garden or researching the best seasonal flowers for their yard. When you visit these friends, you are amazed at their newest plants or flowers.

If you know nothing about gardening, how can you show your plant-loving friend you care with the perfect gift? The answer is simple. Give your friend a solar garden light. The Premier Solar Garden Light GS-139 Set of 2 is perfect for illuminating walkways to your friend's garden as well as lighting flower beds. Your friend's charming array of flowers and greenery can be appreciated 24/7 with a solar garden light.

A group of friends is not complete without the "Pinterest House" pal. These designers have an eye for the perfect setup of any home. When you visit this friend, you are hit with the impression of walking into a magazine-worthy architectural setup. Every element in the home is well placed, and every DIY project reflects your friend's carpenter skills. This person is on a whole new level when it comes to impeccable home design.

To show your appreciation as well as add to your friend's architectural design, give a unique solar accent light. The Infinity Solar Up and Down Wall Light GS-120 has plenty of benefits for your friend's outdoor area. This fixture highlights important angles and height features on home exteriors.

All of your friend's hard work to their outdoor areas mean nothing if no one can see it at night. The GS-120 complements the most aesthetically pleasing parts of a home, so the home's architectural design is fully appreciated.

When your friends are trying to coordinate schedules to get together, the best person to turn to is the Party Planner. This friend is organized, can multi-task, and loves hosting parties at their home. Every event overseen by this person is always memorable and fun. If you are having trouble thinking of the perfect gift for the best planner and party-thrower, we have the solution.

The Baytown II Bulb Solar Hanging Light GS-105B-CX is great for outdoor events. This hanging light has a 360° spread and will cast a warm glow on your friend's hosting space. The remote-control capabilities of the light will allow your friend to tend to their responsibilities while simultaneously adjusting the light's intensity. It's simply every multi-tasker's dream. Enhance your Party Planner's next event with the GS-105B-CX.

Perhaps the most successful friend of your group is a business owner. This person wears many hats in the work environment, and has no trouble working long hours to keep the business running. They are often making updates both indoors and outdoors so the store front looks its best.

The 2W Solar Flood Light with Warm or Bright White LEDs GS-203 is perfect for business owners. This light is commonly used to light business signs and store fronts, as it casts a strong glow of 250 lumens. The light can be staked into the ground or placed on a flat surface. In addition, the solar panel can be attached to the fixture or placed remotely up to 12 feet away. You will have the option between warm white or bright white color temperature when you make your purchase.

The GS-203 solar flood light also works great for lighting flag poles, fountains, and other landscape in both commercial and residential applications.

Not to be confused with the Designer/Architect, this "DIY Guy" or "Mr. Fix It" has experience fixing things around the home. Your friends may refer to this person as a "Jack of All Trades" when it comes to home maintenance and repair. This person always has at least one home improvement project in the works, but they will drop everything in a heartbeat to help you or your friends with a leaky faucet or broken garbage disposal.

How do you give the perfect gift to someone who has given so much of their time to help you and your friends? The answer is a solar shed light. The Light My Shed IV - Solar Shed Light - GS-16B is perfect for your Home Improver. When your friend is up late at night with their projects, they need to be able to access their tools and supplies without fumbling in the dark. The GS-16B provides a convenient and environmentally-friendly light source for any workspace. Whether it's a shed, storage unit, or garage, this light will fit right in at your friend's workshop.

When you or one of your friends moves into a new space, this particular friend is there with sound advice for home security. With hours of research and plenty of devices to make any home a fortress, it's no wonder this friend is known as The Protector. This person enjoys learning new tips about home security, and often will invite you and your friends to join them at conventions that feature the latest technology in the industry.

You can be one step ahead of the top practices in home security and impress your friend with the perfect gift. The 12W Solar Security Light with Motion Sensor GS-201 will show your friend just how much you care about their safety. This solar security light has a weather-resistant frame that allows the fixture to operate year-round without fail. Shining at an impressive 1440 lumens, this motion-activated solar light will deter any intruder.

Gama Sonic knows how much your Protector loves to do their research. We've gone ahead and made a helpful guide for the GS-201. View our Top 10 Favorite Things about the GS-201 today to learn more about this solar security light.

No group of friends would be complete without the sunny personality of the Summer Lover. This person enjoys warmer seasons and spends many days lounging by the pool in the summer. Your friend can enjoy working on their tan during the day and cooling off at night when they have solar lights framing their pool.

The Acorn Finial Solar Light GS-138 will add a touch of sophistication to any outdoor pool area. This light's warm glow will accentuate your friend's pool, making it very inviting at night. Your friend will now be able to enjoy their pool both during the day and in the late evenings. By giving your summer enthusiast the gift of solar power, they will be even more excited for the warmer seasons to return.

Now that you have a gift guide for all of your friends, it's time to get started and shop Gama Sonic's solar lighting solutions. We are certain that your friends will light up as much as our fixtures when they open their presents this year. After this holiday season, you may even earn the title of Best Gift Giver among your friend group.

Choose Gama Sonic as your provider for the best gifts this holiday season. For questions about our products, please call 1-800-835-4113

What is the best solar light for a holiday gift?

If none of your friends fit in to any of the above categories, do not worry. The Solar Address Sign GS-80 is a perfect go-to for the gift-giving season.

How do I decide on a solar light gift for a friend?

Gama Sonic has a wide variety of solar lights to choose from to match your friend's unique personality. Call us today and we will help you find the perfect solar lighting gift: 1-800-835-4113

What color accent chairs and pillows should I use. Dark gray sectional,light yellow walls, light hardwofloors?

Blue pillows & black chairs/ (:

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LED Solar Wall Lamp|Solar Motion Sensor Light|Solar Wall Lights|LED Solar Lights|Outdoor Wall Lights
Shenzhen Geshide Technology Co., LTD is a manufacturing & trading combo, strength to the LED lighting products over 10 years. We specialized in outdoor solar wall lights, solar flame lights, working lights and flashlights. We expects to share the most professional, front-end, and most favorable solar powered system with you.Naked-Eye AstronomyHuman awareness of the universe began when people realized that they could observe objects in the sky, and that what they saw changed over days, months, and years. To any observer on the ground looking at the sky with the naked eye, the sky appears to be a vast spherical bowl, a celestial sphere that extends from all points along the horizon to the zenith, the point directly overhead. Astronomical objects seen in the sky are so far away that observers viewing them without the aid of a telescope have no intuitive sense of which objects are closer than others. This lack of depth perception causes everything to appear equidistant on the sky. Any object's position on this sphere can be determined by two coordinates, which designate the object's horizontal and vertical location. The vertical coordinate is determined by measuring an altitude angle upwards from the nearest point on the horizon, and the horizontal coordinate is established by measuring an azimuth angle from due north eastwards along the horizon to that nearest point. This system is called either the horizon coordinate system or the altazimuth system (see Figure 1). About 6,000 stars are visible to the naked eye when you can achieve the darkest conditions. The positions of the stars relative to each other remain fixed from night to night and year to year. In general, stars in the same area of the sky have no physical relationship to each other, but the very human tendency to impose order upon otherwise random distributions yields patterns of brighter stars, or constellations. Many constellations of the Northern Hemisphere have been inherited from antiquity, including Ursa Major, the Big Bear, of which the more familiar Big Dipper is part, and Orion, the hunter, which can be seen in the winter sky. Many Southern Hemisphere constellations were defined in the last century to fill in unlabeled regions of the sky. The sky is now officially divided into 88 constellations, which are used in modern astronomy for naming purposes. For example, the star alpha Ursa Majoris ( UMa) is located in the Big Bear constellation. Therefore, Ursa Majoris comes from the name of the constellation, Ursa Major, and the Greek letter indicates that it's the brightest star within that constellation. In addition to modern names, some 90 or so stars also have names from antiquity. For instance, UMa is also known as Dubhe. Over the course of the night, stars move across the sky from east to west as a consequence of Earth's rotation on its axis. The stars appear to move in circular paths around a celestial pole, or either of two points on the celestial sphere where the extensions of Earth's axis would intersect. In the Northern Hemisphere, the celestial pole is coincidentally marked by the relatively bright star alpha Ursa Minoris, also known as Polaris. Simple geometry shows that the altitude angle of the pole star above the northern horizon is equivalent to the latitude of the observer on Earth. To an observer in the Northern Hemisphere, stars that are always above the northern horizon are known as circumpolar stars; an observer in the Southern Hemisphere would see circumpolar stars around the south celestial pole. Stars that are further to the south and that rise and set sometime during the night are called equatorial stars. Equatorial stars rise in the east, move diagonally into the southern sky, achieving their highest position above the horizon on the meridian (the great circle that extends from due north on the horizon, through the zenith, to due south on the horizon). From the meridian, these stars move westward until they set below the western horizon. The celestial equator is that great circle formed on the celestial sphere by extending the plane of the Earth's equator. The equator intersects the horizon due west and due east. An immediate consequence of Earth's rotation is identifying the preferred directions of north, south, east, and west around the horizon, called cardinal directions, by which humans naturally orient themselves. Minute by minute, over the course of the night, both the altitude and azimuth of a star continually change. To more easily observe and track celestial objects, scientists have defined celestial coordinate systems that are fixed upon the sky and thus move with the stars. The equatorial coordinate system is a projection onto the sky of Earth's latitude and longitude coordinate system. Celestial latitude, known as declination, is the angular position north or south of celestial equation. Celestial longitude, measured around the celestial equation, is known as the right ascension (see Figure 2). Declination is measured in degrees, minutes of arc, and seconds of arc. Recognizing that the stars appear to move once around the sky in one day (24 hours), right ascension is measured not in degrees, but in hours, with 24 hours of right ascension (to distinguish from 24 hours of time) equal to 360 degrees. Like the stars, the Sun rises and sets every day. However, unlike the fixed motion of the stars, the Sun's daily path across the sky varies throughout the year. Twice annually, at the vernal equinox (about March 21) and the autumnal equinox (about September 21), the Sun's position coincides with the celestial equator; it rises due east, moves across the sky following the path of the equator, and sets due west (see Figure 3). At this time of year, the length of the day is the same as the length of the night. During the summer, however, the solar position is north of the equator, achieving a maximum northernmost declination of 23.5 degrees at the time of the summer solstice, around June 21. In the winter, the solar position is reversed, with the Sun at its maximum southernmost declination of -23.5 degrees at the time of winter solstice, December 21. The terms equinox and solstice mark not only specific times of the year, but also specific points in the sky. The vernal equinox is that position on the celestial equator where the Sun crosses from the southern into the northern sky. Celestial longitude (right ascension) is measured eastward around the equator from this point. The Sun's seasonal positions in the sky. Relative to the background stars, the Sun also moves about one degree eastward each day, thus encircling the sky in the course of a year. This ecliptic, or the great circle on the celestial sphere defined by the solar path, is tilted with respect to the celestial equator by 23.5 degrees. Throughout the year, the ecliptic passes through the 12 zodiacal constellations. Because the apparent solar movement is caused by Earth's motion around the Sun, the ecliptic plane is also a projection of Earth's orbit about the Sun. That Earth's rotational equatorial plane does not perfectly match its orbital plane (the ecliptic plane) about the Sun is directly responsible for the annual northsouth movement of the Sun and the consequent seasons. The length of the year is based on the time that the Sun takes to complete its annual path around the sky. During the year, the stars and constellations visible at night change as the seasons pass through their cycle. A year is, in fact, 365.25 days long. To keep the calendar in sync with the actual seasonal passage of time, every four years we have a leap year, or a year of 366 days. The additional day, February 29, makes up for the time lost annually when the 365.25 day cycle is computed as 365 days. The length of a day is based on the time it takes for the Sun to complete its daily path across the sky, from its crossing of the meridian at noon to its next crossing of the meridian the next day. Daily time based on the hourly position of the Sun in the sky, relative to its noontime position each day, is called apparent solar time. To astronomers studying the stars, however, the time of day alone is not a sufficient method for determining which stars can be observed at any given time. Astronomers need to know both the time of day and where the Sun is in the sky to find out which stars they can observe. More specifically, what is of interest to an astronomer is the sidereal time, or the right ascension of the stars that are crossing the meridian at any moment. Sidereal time and solar time are not equal because of the annual motion of the Sun across the sky. The true rotation period of Earth is 23 hours, 56 minutes, but the length of the day is four minutes longer. In one rotation of Earth, the Sun has moved roughly one degree across the sky, thus Earth has to rotate a little bit longer to get the Sun back to the same position on the sky. The solar day is 24 hours long. The actual length of any given day varies throughout the course of the year for two reasons. First, Earth's orbit around the Sun is not a circle, but an ellipse. The Sun's apparent motion across the sky therefore varies slightly, moving more than the average one degree per day in January, but a bit less than the average in July. Second, the solar motion along the ecliptic moves parallel to the celestial equator at the times of the solstices when the Sun is farthest north or south of the equator, but at the times of equinoxes, its motion is at an angle to the celestial equator. What is important for the length of the day is only that part of the solar motion parallel to the equator. This produces a second variation to the length of the day. The difference between apparent solar time (which would be shown by a sundial) and mean solar time (which would be shown by a clock or watch) is called the equation of time. This is a complicated effect involving orbital mechanics (the motion around an ellipse is not uniform), perspective (a moving object closer to the observer has a greater apparent motion), the tilt of the ecliptic to the equator (hence the daily component of solar motion across the sky varies from equinox to solstice), and a geometrical factor resulting from the fact that we are dealing with a spherical coordinate system; this latter you can demonstrate to yourself by placing your thumb on the equator of a globe. Note how much longitude angle it covers. Now place your thumb near the north pole. Your thumb will cover the same area, but as measured in longitude, it covers a much bigger longitudinal angle. And it's that angle that is important for rotation and hence the length of a day. Noon, as defined by mean solar time, can occur as much as 16 minutes late in October or 14 minutes early in February compared to the Sun's actual crossing of the meridian. Observation of the Moon shows that it not only appears to change its position by moving around Earth, but at the same time, the fraction of its surface that is illuminated by sunlight (its phase) also changes (see Figure 4). When the Moon is directly opposite the position of the Sun, it appears totally illuminated, or in full phase. When the Moon is viewed at an angle of 90 degrees from the position of the Sun, its surface appears half illuminated, or in its quarter phase. Between full and quarter Moon, the phase is said to be gibbous. If less than half the Moon is illuminated by sunlight, the phase is crescent. When the Moon is in the direction of the Sun and the side toward Earth is its dark or shadowed half, the Moon is said to be new. The cycle from new Moon waxing (increasing illumination) to first quarter to full Moon, then waning (decreasing illumination) to third quarter and back to new Moon takes 29.5 days, a period adopted as the basis of our calendrical month. The lunar phases are observed because of the changing geometrical orientation between the Sun, Moon, and Earth over the course of the lunar month, not the result of Earth casting its shadow on the Moon. The Moon takes 27.3 days to move once (360 degrees) around Earth as determined by its orbital position relative to the stars; the orbital period is therefore also an example of a sidereal period, a period measured relative to the stars. This 27.3 days can also be called a sidereal month. The time from full Moon to full Moon is longer, 29.5 days, because two motions are involved: the motion of the Moon around Earth and the motion of Earth around the Sun. To become full again, the Moon must move more than 360 degrees around Earth. The lunar month, or lunation, is thus an example of a synodic period, or a period produced as the consequence of two motions. The term synodic month is also applied to this 29.5 day period. Another example of the difference between a sidereal period and a synodic period is the rotation of Earth (23 hours, 56 minutes) and the length of a day (24 hours). The actual path across the sky of the Moon is quite complicated. The lunar orbital plane is tilted about 5 degrees 9 minutes with respect to ecliptic plane. The orientation of these two planes rotate with respect to each other over an 18.6 year period. In consequence, relative to the celestial equator, the lunar orbital plane has a variable tilt that periodically oscillates from 23.5 degrees minus 5 degrees 9 minutes equals 18.3 degrees, to 23.5 degrees plus 5 degrees 9 minutes equals 28.7 degrees. In other words, over the course of the month, the Moon can oscillate north and south across the celestial equator between declinations of as little as 18.3 degrees to as much as 28.7 degrees. Each month the path of the Moon across the sky differs slightly from its path the prior month and from its path the next month. In contrast, each year the solar path around the sky is essentially the same. Astronomers find particularly interesting the two intersection points, or nodes, between the great circles of the ecliptic plane and the lunar orbit. If the Sun and Moon in their motions about Earth move simultaneously through nodal positions, an eclipse occurs (see Figure ). If the Moon and Sun are at the same node, the Moon passes in front of the Sun and a solar eclipse results, lasting only a few minutes in duration. If the two are at opposite nodes, then the Moon passes through the shadow of the Earth and a longer duration lunar eclipse occurs. The cycle of occurrence of eclipses is quite complicated because three factors are involved. The Sun moves around the sky in 365.25 days. The Moon moves once around the sky every 27.3 days. The direction to a node (where the two orbital planes intersect) moves around the sky in 18.6 years. To get an eclipse, all three positions (Moon, Sun, and node) have to be along a straight line through Earth. This event does not happen with a simple pattern of regular time intervals. Nakedeye observers in antiquity recognized five other objects that move across the sky relative to the stars - the planets. The word planet comes from the Greek, meaning "wanderer." Planetary motion is more complicated than that of the Moon or Sun, which move systematically west to east relative to the stars. The planets' usual motion is west to east, termed direct or prograde motion. But in each synodic period, planets show a brief period of motion in the opposite or retrograde direction. Retrograde motion is the result of perspective. Consider, for example, driving on a freeway. You look forward toward a slower moving car. Relative to the distant mountains, it is clear that this car is moving in the same direction you are moving. But as you catch up to and bypass the slower car, you see it appear to be moving backwards compared to the distant horizon. As you pull ahead, once again looking back at the slower car shows it to be moving forward. Observation of other planets from Earth produces the same apparent reversal of motion relative to the background of stars. (See Figure 6).
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