Pillar Post Light on 1988 Olds 98 Not Working?

I believe the lens comes off by prying the edges lightly to release plastic tabs. Be careful as the plastic is old. Not sure what bulb it takes but you will be able to remove it and take it with you for a replacement

1. A question about the 6th pillar of fascism--control of mass media?

Well lets see ABC,NBC,CBS,CNN,New York Times, LA Times,Newsweek,Time,Boston Globe, Atlanta Journal, MSNBC,NPR etc..on and on.. all left wing vs Fox -right wing. Well ,Fox must be the fascist all right.

2. Ask Ethan: What Caused This Remarkable 'Sun Pillar' Shortly After Sunrise?

When you look at the Sun on a day where there's a clear sky, you normally expect to see a blinding orb of light. But every once in a while, the atmosphere has a bit of a surprise for us, and gives us a sight that's rare and unfamiliar. Rachel Perry, an amateur photographer from Virginia Beach, wrote in (along with the above picture) after observing this phenomenon she would never captured before. The short answer is that this is known as a Sun Pillar, but the science behind it is completely fascinating. Let's dive in. If all we had to work with were the emitted light from the Sun, optical phenomena like this would never, ever occur. The Sun emits a fascinating set of light that we can coarsely model as a blackbody: a perfect absorber that's heated up to a specific temperature, where it radiates energy away. It's an excellent approximation, but science has done even better than this approximation. The Sun is not actually a solid, perfectly absorptive body, but rather emits light from many different surfaces throughout its tenuous outer layers. This matters, because the lower-down layers are at a higher temperature than the uppermost layers, so it's more accurate to model the Sun as the sum of a series of blackbodies, as you see above. Moreover, the Sun contains a wide variety of atoms, and these atoms absorb light at specific frequencies (below), meaning there are "gaps" in the light that actually leaves the Sun. As it travels through the void of empty space, this light simply spreads out in a spherical shape as it radiates omnidirectionally away from the Sun. If we lived on a world without an atmosphere at all, this is exactly the light we would observe: the same light that the Sun itself radiated away. But we live on planet Earth, which - to an astronomer, at least - is like viewing the entire Universe from the bottom of a swimming pool. Our atmosphere absorbs, scatters, or reflects a large portion of the sunlight that strikes it, even on a perfectly clear day. The absorbed light gets re-radiated as infrared light; the scattered light affects different wavelengths to different degrees and turns the sky blue; the reflected light returns back to space. The majority of the sunlight that strikes our atmosphere will makes it through, however, and that's what we observe when it's perfectly clear. Now, we have to add one more layer of complexity to understand what is going on: the properties of our atmosphere. If you thought our atmosphere was about 4 parts nitrogen to 1 part oxygen, congratulations, as that's exactly what the majority of Earth's atmosphere is composed of. There's about 1% argon sprinkled in there, along with trace amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and other gases as well. But the atmosphere also contains water vapor: in large (about 1-2%) quantities that vary with time and specific conditions. Moreover, the atmosphere also has severe temperature gradients to it, which does something very interesting when you throw water vapor into the mix. At some point, the temperature will be such that the water will no longer remain in the gaseous phase, and will either condense into liquid droplets (forming the clouds you are familiar with) or go all the way into the solid phase, forming ice. While you might think about atmospheric ice in the form of hailstones or sleet, what is actually far more common, particularly at very high altitudes, is that very small crystals are formed high up in the atmosphere. These crystals do not look like the complex snowflakes you are accustomed to, but rather preferentially form into a hexagonal shape: one of the most common shapes for ice crystals made of small numbers of water molecules. All hexagonally shaped ice crystals have the same angles at their vertices, which leads to the same angles-of-reflection for any sunlight that strikes it. Those same optical properties that are at play in the atmosphere in general - refraction, reflection, transmission, scattering, etc. - still occur among these ice crystals, but the results are far more striking and spectacular. The hexagonal symmetry can make long pillars (known as columns) or thin plates, but they all have the same angles between each of their faces. When those crystals are created, they are always heavier-than-air, which is true for all forms of ice. As these ice crystals start to fall, they are slowed by air resistance, and the specific balance between air resistance and the crystals themselves will determine their orientation relative to our line-of-sight. Plate crystals normally drift downward like leaves, with the large face parallel to the ground, while column crystals are normally oriented horizontally. When the sunlight strikes those crystals, however, it always causes the light to reflect off at a set of predictable angles, while we are only capable of observing the light that's at just the right angle to strike our eyes. This typically manifests in only three ways: a large halo of light that's at a specific separation angle (22) from the Sun (from randomly oriented crystals), a pillar of light that's due to vertical reflections from either plate crystals (when the Sun is very close to the horizon) or column crystals (when the Sun is somewhat higher), or a combination of the two effects, where horizontal crystals reflect light from the vertical parts of a halo, creating the "flared" halo effect known as a sun dog. The fact that the picture in question was taken about an hour after sunrise indicates that the dominant pillar effect is due to largely to column crystals that are falling through the atmosphere, both above and below the Sun's apparent location. Given the date, time, and location of the event, the Sun is approximately 9 above the horizon at the moment this photograph was snapped. Investigations into the optical properties of various light pillars (which include not only sun pillars, but similar pillars due to the Moon or any other, even artificial, light sources) have taught us that the thin plate crystals are responsible for pillars where the Sun is below or very near (within 6 of) the horizon, while the horizontally-oriented column crystals are primarily responsible for the pillars when the Sun is at higher positions (up to 20 above the horizon). The dominant cause of this observed pillar, therefore, is likely due to column crystals. What is fascinating about this particular sun pillar that was captured here is that it comes along with an even rarer optical phenomenon: an elliptical halo. Elliptical haloes are only rarely visible, and are one of the least well-understood optical phenomena we observe in our atmosphere. There can be up to three elliptical rings seen at once around the Sun, but normally they are entirely lost in the Sun's bright glare. While we do not know for certain what causes these elliptical haloes, one fascinating approach is to simulate what could create this optical phenomenon with ray-tracing. Instead of hexagonal plate or column crystals, it's plausible that some of these crystals could be flawed plates: where the top and bottom faces are not completely flat, but are instead very shallow pyramids, with angles that depart from perfect flatness by only 1-to-3. But we also have to be careful about ascribing 100% of the optical phenomena we see here to the atmosphere alone. Oftentimes, particularly when it comes to photographing bright objects like the Sun, there are internal reflections and optical effects that occur inside the components of the camera itself. Many of the rays you see in photos like this may not appear to your eyes; this becomes clear when you notice the rays coming off of the water's reflection, which one only sees in photographs, not with direct observations. Nevertheless, both the pillar and the elliptical halo are definitely real, and the photographer was very fortunate to be able to catch them. Fewer than 1-in-1,000 sunsets and sunrises contain these remarkable phenomena; to everyone who gets to see or experience one for themselves, appreciate that you are being treated to something that most humans will never encounter even once. Almost all of the atmospheric phenomena that result in light appearing in a location other where the main source is are due to either ice crystals or water droplets in the atmosphere. While rainbows and glories arise from water droplets, almost everything else we observe is due to ice crystals. Here, we are treated not only to the sun pillar phenomenon, but also an accompanying set of very rare elliptical haloes, made possible only by the right conditions that are still in the process of being uncovered. Whatever the cause, it's one more reminder to take in the spectacular sights that the natural world has to offer. You never know how it will wind up surprising and amazing you unless you look. Send in your Ask Ethan questions to startswithabang at gmail dot com

3. How can the Catholic Church be considered a pillar of morality when...?

"When the Vatican excommunicates women for attempting to become priests but does not excommunicate male priests for raping children." Women cannot be priests in the Christian faith. The ordination of women would be invalid. The Church does lacitize and excommunicate convicted priests. It is proper for the Church to excommunicate those responsible for the murder of unborn children. I assume you are speaking of the Brazilian girl who was not pregnant with twins and doctors agree that the baby could have been carried by the mother until it was of a viable gestation period to live with no harm to either the mother or the baby. I do not know of any leaders of the third Reich that survived to be excommunicated. God bless! In Christ Fr. Joseph

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When we first sold in Amazon, our goal was to work hard to recommend beautiful and practical lighting fixtures for everyone. Our Promise We are committed to ensuring complete customer satisfaction, and if you have any questions after receiving your product, just let us know and we will provide you with the best solution.Am upgrading from a nikon d-40 to 90 or 300s what lens would be good for boat ride pics with landscape/fishin?they are going to extra healthful and do their interest, yet wo not meter. in case you have any older AF lenses, those wo not AF, the two. i could desire to assert besides, the Nikon F is a great digicam.In your opinion, why has our political landscape become one of party politics as opposed to being an individual and doing what is right?In a Democratic (or any, really) political system, unified numbers are power. That is the power to do right or wrong. And, when one side has power and you disagree with them on important issues, having your own party to do your own right (or wrong) is essential to achieving what you want to achieveAre Democrats typically, generally more liberal today than they were 20 years ago or is the political landscape simply much more polarized than it was 20 years ago?i think the whole country has shifted right. democrats now are where republicans used to be. republicans are somewhere back in the dark ages.I like 18th century landscape paintings but I am a poor slave with no income to indulge my artistic needs...?Yes,the idea seems ok...but i dont think it will look like the original if u are all creative and artistic, y dont u try reproducing these pieces...ull have a lot of fun too and paints dont cost that much..How far from a road do I need to be to not hear the traffic?This depends enormously on landscape, weather, and infrastructure.I grew up in The Netherlands several hundred meter from a motorway, but with good noise barriers, we heard almost nothing. My friend lives less than 100 metre from a noise-barriered motorway and it's nearly inaudible. Now I live several km from a motorway in England, without noise barriers. Depending on the weather, I either hear nothing at all or it's so annoying I can not stand being in my garden, and hear it even with the windows closed. I've been considering to buy a sound pressure level meter to compare my impression to something measurable and try to relate it to my circumstances. The quietest weather tends to be dense fog, when traffic is either crawling or stationary, both of which are sufficiently quiet several kms away.If there's a hill between you and the road, or if the road is underground, you will hear (nearly) nothing even very close. But if the road is in a valley and you are up on the slope, you might hear it many kms away. I've been 10 km from roads and still found some heavy powerful lorries going uphill disturbing, but that on a mostly open landscape with at most small sub-Arctic mountain birch forest type trees.In some countries there are interactive noise maps, such as this one for England. I found the value of this quite limited, as my personal experience is worse than this map claims for my area. It also depends on the road, of course. Some roads have traffic all night, others become completely quiet.Personally, my strategy if I am near a road, is to seek out a sound I find pleasant rather than annoying: specifically, a stream or river. Those may drown out the road sound such that I can pretend to be in the wilderness rather than right next to a road.Which work would you say has had a bigger impact on the cultural landscape, the original Star Wars (1977) or (the book versions of) Lord of the Rings and why?If you take away Lord of the Rings, you instantly also lose Dungeons & Dragons in all of its iterations. You still have wargamers, who push miniatures a designated distance over adorable little fake terrain, but you do not have roleplayers. No spinoff products, like the fairly hilarious Choose Your Own Adventure novels from the 1980s. No t-shirts. No attempts, by TSR or anyone else, to set roleplaying games in the far future, Wild West, or Lovecraftosphere. No Live-Action Roleplaying (LARP) groups, at least not the orc vs. elf kind. No Satanic Panic over the cultural impact in the seventies and eighties (even in E. T. the Extraterrestrial, the protagonist's older brother is playing D&D with his friends in an early scene, much expanded on in the novelization). No hilariously awful novel Mazes & Monsters, and the resulting movie, a breakthrough role for a young Tom Hanks. No Jack Chick tract "Dark Dungeons." No Stranger Things
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