Sinclair's Legacy Lives on at Duntroon Cross Country Ski Facilitysinclair's Legacy Lives on at Duntr

DUNTROON —Larry Sinclair’s legacy will continue to light the way for cross-country skiers, literally.

A

crowd-funding effort

to run lights along the trails of Highlands Nordic in memory of Sinclair, who died last month after a lengthy battle with cancer, has already surpassed its $25,000 goal —and more continues to pour in.

The fundraising idea is the brainchild of Highlands Nordic members Susie Saunderson and Richard Lemoine; Lemoine is also past-president of the Highland Trailblazers

“Larry had the idea about three years ago it would be good to light a portion of the trails,” Lemoine said. “We have high school kids here every night to train, and while this time of year it’s still bright, but in December by four o’clock, you need lights.”

He and Sinclair tried it five years ago, setting solar-powered garden lights along the trail. However, those only remained lit for about 30 minutes.

Lemoine said other cross-country courses have been hard-wired for lighting — an expensive proposition for a small club.

“The problem is you get voltage drop, so you end up either using cable that’s two-inches thick that costs $50 a foot, or you drop transformers everywhere and they cost about $10,000 each,” he said.

Lemoine has always experimented with electronics. He walked into a hobby shop he frequented and came across some 12-volt solar-powered LED lights.

He and Larry figured out a way to set it up, ran some tests, and were ready to roll it out this year before Sinclair became sick.

The decision to go ahead came after chatting with people about the best way to honour Sinclair’s legacy in the development of cross-country skiing, locally, and across the country.

“When he passed away, people talked and asked ‘what can we do?’ That was one of his dreams was the lights,” said Lemoine, a former president of Cross Country Canada.

Sinclair had started a program to get people to sponsor the lights for $300 each; however, it was Saunderson who suggested that a crowd-funding campaign would allow more people to donate smaller amounts.

While they were expecting $10 and $20 donations, one came it at $2,000. Another person contributed $1,000.

“I thought I’d ask politely, ‘did you make a mistake and thought you were donating $200’, and [the answer was] ‘no,’” Lemoine said.

There’s also another $10,000 that’s been given ‘offline.’ Lemoine said the outpouring of support for the project speaks to the respect Sinclair had in the sport.

“Absolutely,” he said. “Initially we were just going to do the crowdfunding for about $8,000.”

However, when they started thinking about it, they upped the goal to $24,000 – or about $3,000 per kilometre of trail that would be lit.

“It was almost like, ‘what would happen if,’” he said. “It was kind of like a stretch goal, and after the first day, [we realized] it wasn’t going to be much of a stretch.”

The group is now considering what else to do as a tribute to Sinclair, and the decision has been made to create a competitive course at the north end of the property. Work should begin this summer, and it will be ready for next winter.

“Larry really built race trails, and the recreational park came as an afterthought. These are some of the toughest trails in the country – there’s not one single hill where you get a free ride,” Lemoine said. “You never come down a one hill with enough speed to get up the next.

“Every [other] recreational trail has rollers, and a couple of hard pushes and you’re over the top.”

Logistically, when Highlands hosts a race, it has to close down to recreational skiers. Also, noted Lemoine, a true race trail has an uphill to finish, while Highlands finishes on a downgrade.

There would also be permanent timing facilities.

“It would be your ideal race course,” he said. “We would do it to Olympic standards.”

DUNTROON —Larry Sinclair’s legacy will continue to light the way for cross-country skiers, literally.

A

crowd-funding effort

to run lights along the trails of Highlands Nordic in memory of Sinclair, who died last month after a lengthy battle with cancer, has already surpassed its $25,000 goal —and more continues to pour in.

The fundraising idea is the brainchild of Highlands Nordic members Susie Saunderson and Richard Lemoine; Lemoine is also past-president of the Highland Trailblazers

“Larry had the idea about three years ago it would be good to light a portion of the trails,” Lemoine said. “We have high school kids here every night to train, and while this time of year it’s still bright, but in December by four o’clock, you need lights.”

He and Sinclair tried it five years ago, setting solar-powered garden lights along the trail. However, those only remained lit for about 30 minutes.

Lemoine said other cross-country courses have been hard-wired for lighting — an expensive proposition for a small club.

“The problem is you get voltage drop, so you end up either using cable that’s two-inches thick that costs $50 a foot, or you drop transformers everywhere and they cost about $10,000 each,” he said.

Lemoine has always experimented with electronics. He walked into a hobby shop he frequented and came across some 12-volt solar-powered LED lights.

He and Larry figured out a way to set it up, ran some tests, and were ready to roll it out this year before Sinclair became sick.

The decision to go ahead came after chatting with people about the best way to honour Sinclair’s legacy in the development of cross-country skiing, locally, and across the country.

“When he passed away, people talked and asked ‘what can we do?’ That was one of his dreams was the lights,” said Lemoine, a former president of Cross Country Canada.

Sinclair had started a program to get people to sponsor the lights for $300 each; however, it was Saunderson who suggested that a crowd-funding campaign would allow more people to donate smaller amounts.

While they were expecting $10 and $20 donations, one came it at $2,000. Another person contributed $1,000.

“I thought I’d ask politely, ‘did you make a mistake and thought you were donating $200’, and [the answer was] ‘no,’” Lemoine said.

There’s also another $10,000 that’s been given ‘offline.’ Lemoine said the outpouring of support for the project speaks to the respect Sinclair had in the sport.

“Absolutely,” he said. “Initially we were just going to do the crowdfunding for about $8,000.”

However, when they started thinking about it, they upped the goal to $24,000 – or about $3,000 per kilometre of trail that would be lit.

“It was almost like, ‘what would happen if,’” he said. “It was kind of like a stretch goal, and after the first day, [we realized] it wasn’t going to be much of a stretch.”

The group is now considering what else to do as a tribute to Sinclair, and the decision has been made to create a competitive course at the north end of the property. Work should begin this summer, and it will be ready for next winter.

“Larry really built race trails, and the recreational park came as an afterthought. These are some of the toughest trails in the country – there’s not one single hill where you get a free ride,” Lemoine said. “You never come down a one hill with enough speed to get up the next.

“Every [other] recreational trail has rollers, and a couple of hard pushes and you’re over the top.”

Logistically, when Highlands hosts a race, it has to close down to recreational skiers. Also, noted Lemoine, a true race trail has an uphill to finish, while Highlands finishes on a downgrade.

There would also be permanent timing facilities.

“It would be your ideal race course,” he said. “We would do it to Olympic standards.”

DUNTROON —Larry Sinclair’s legacy will continue to light the way for cross-country skiers, literally.

A

crowd-funding effort

to run lights along the trails of Highlands Nordic in memory of Sinclair, who died last month after a lengthy battle with cancer, has already surpassed its $25,000 goal —and more continues to pour in.

The fundraising idea is the brainchild of Highlands Nordic members Susie Saunderson and Richard Lemoine; Lemoine is also past-president of the Highland Trailblazers

“Larry had the idea about three years ago it would be good to light a portion of the trails,” Lemoine said. “We have high school kids here every night to train, and while this time of year it’s still bright, but in December by four o’clock, you need lights.”

He and Sinclair tried it five years ago, setting solar-powered garden lights along the trail. However, those only remained lit for about 30 minutes.

Lemoine said other cross-country courses have been hard-wired for lighting — an expensive proposition for a small club.

“The problem is you get voltage drop, so you end up either using cable that’s two-inches thick that costs $50 a foot, or you drop transformers everywhere and they cost about $10,000 each,” he said.

Lemoine has always experimented with electronics. He walked into a hobby shop he frequented and came across some 12-volt solar-powered LED lights.

He and Larry figured out a way to set it up, ran some tests, and were ready to roll it out this year before Sinclair became sick.

The decision to go ahead came after chatting with people about the best way to honour Sinclair’s legacy in the development of cross-country skiing, locally, and across the country.

“When he passed away, people talked and asked ‘what can we do?’ That was one of his dreams was the lights,” said Lemoine, a former president of Cross Country Canada.

Sinclair had started a program to get people to sponsor the lights for $300 each; however, it was Saunderson who suggested that a crowd-funding campaign would allow more people to donate smaller amounts.

While they were expecting $10 and $20 donations, one came it at $2,000. Another person contributed $1,000.

“I thought I’d ask politely, ‘did you make a mistake and thought you were donating $200’, and [the answer was] ‘no,’” Lemoine said.

There’s also another $10,000 that’s been given ‘offline.’ Lemoine said the outpouring of support for the project speaks to the respect Sinclair had in the sport.

“Absolutely,” he said. “Initially we were just going to do the crowdfunding for about $8,000.”

However, when they started thinking about it, they upped the goal to $24,000 – or about $3,000 per kilometre of trail that would be lit.

“It was almost like, ‘what would happen if,’” he said. “It was kind of like a stretch goal, and after the first day, [we realized] it wasn’t going to be much of a stretch.”

The group is now considering what else to do as a tribute to Sinclair, and the decision has been made to create a competitive course at the north end of the property. Work should begin this summer, and it will be ready for next winter.

“Larry really built race trails, and the recreational park came as an afterthought. These are some of the toughest trails in the country – there’s not one single hill where you get a free ride,” Lemoine said. “You never come down a one hill with enough speed to get up the next.

“Every [other] recreational trail has rollers, and a couple of hard pushes and you’re over the top.”

Logistically, when Highlands hosts a race, it has to close down to recreational skiers. Also, noted Lemoine, a true race trail has an uphill to finish, while Highlands finishes on a downgrade.

There would also be permanent timing facilities.

“It would be your ideal race course,” he said. “We would do it to Olympic standards.”

get in touch with us
recommended articles
News
What Do Solar Street Lamps Look Like?
For the evaluation of solar street lamps, it depends on whether the solar street lamp manufacturers strictly control the quality. Of course, we can also see the quality of solar street lamps from several aspects to see whether they meet the requirements we need. We can see from the number of days it resists cloudy and rainy days, the illuminance and service life of light sources, the service life of batteries and the technology of controllers, Judging from the overall system equipment, the solar street lamp is good or bad.The use of solar street lamps depends on the sun's light to provide energy. Therefore, in rainy days, it depends on whether the capacity of its solar battery can resist 3-5 rainy days. The amount of rain in many areas is not much. Solar street lamps that can resist 3-5 rainy days are very good. Of course, the service life of solar battery is also required to be better.In addition, its lighting brightness is bright enough to ensure people's safety and long service life. Don't turn off the light after using it for a period of time. What is more important is the use of solar controller, because it determines the number of days that solar street lamps resist rain, product stability and quality. Choosing a good solar street lamp saves the price of solar street lamps.
Solar Powered Garden Lights Add Inexpensive Lighting to Your Garden
Solar Powered Garden Lights - Reviews and Suggestions -
Solar Powered Garden Lights Add Inexpensive Lighting to Your Garden
Solar Street Lamp Manufacturers Are Conducive to the Development Environment
Development Direction of Solar Street Lamp Manufacturers
Industry: LED Industry Reshuffle Through Three Forces
A Guide to the Wholesale Solar Light Street Suppliers
5 Easy Steps to Build a Wholesale Solar Light Street Suppliers
How to Choose Professional Outdoor Solar Lights?
related searches
Solar Powered Garden Lights Add Inexpensive Lighting to Your Garden
Solar Powered Garden Lights - Reviews and Suggestions -
Solar Powered Garden Lights Add Inexpensive Lighting to Your Garden
What Do Solar Street Lamps Look Like?
Solar Street Lamp Manufacturers Are Conducive to the Development Environment
Development Direction of Solar Street Lamp Manufacturers
Industry: LED Industry Reshuffle Through Three Forces
A Guide to the Wholesale Solar Light Street Suppliers
5 Easy Steps to Build a Wholesale Solar Light Street Suppliers

Contact Us

Copyright2021@KemecoLighting

Service Support

kemeco@kmc-ltd.com

 Copyright © 2021 Kemeco |Sitemap